View of open fields - Eastern Urban Development Extension
Open Quote

The hedgerows of West Manley Lane are afforded protection under the Hedgerow Regulations 1997... this importance relates to the botanical diversity of woody species and the association of protected and / or rare species of animals

Devon Wildlife Consultants Report 2009

Open Quote

Tiverton Grand Canal and its environs with its walking and cycling leisure opportunities is of great importance giving pleasure to locals and tourists as well as providing biodiversity and economic benefits for the local community

Devon Wildlife Consultants Report 2009

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Britain’s Disappearing Wild Flowers

By WMLCG - posted Oct 28th 2012 at 10:15AM

Britain’s Disappearing Wild Flowers 

We hear a lot about animal extinctions, but what of our native wild flowers?

In the past 60years we have lost ten species: narrow-leaved cudweed, summer lady’s tresses, small bur parsley, purple spurge, lamb’s succory, interrupted brome, downy hemp-nettle, Irish saxifrage, stinking hawksbeard and York groundsel have all disappeared from marshes; meadows and hedgerows. From a total of 1,400 species that might not sound too bad, says Michael McCarthy in The Independent, but if you look at the extinctions at a county level, things start to look rather bleaker: the report by the charity Plantlife, concludes that Middlesex has lost 76 of its wild species; Northamptonshire 74; and the old Scottish county of Banffshire 98.

“I know a bank where thyme blows, where oxlips and the nodding violets grows, quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, with sweet musk rose and with eglantine” wrote William Shakespeare in A Midsummers Night’s Dream. But as the authors of the research note, “the chances of finding these plants on the same bank anywhere in the Midlands is slight. In Warwickshire, there is no chance at all”. 

(The Week 20 Oct 12 issue 891)

Be sure to look at the commissioned Hedgerow Report for the West Manley Lane banks and hedgerows, given the above this report has even greater significance.

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